Piano Recordings


Rita Preisman

Rita Preisman, a Juilliard graduate, was married to Watergate prosecutor Seymour Glanzer. According to her son, Steven Glanzer, she was the daughter of Edith and Albert Preisman. She grew up inside the D.C. Beltway, near downtown Silver Spring, Maryland. She finished high school early, and graduated from Juilliard, where she met her husband, Seymour Glanzer, at age 19. She performed in many local concerts. At 4:30 p.m. on October 26, 1947, at age ten, she made her radio debut on station WGAY, playing Chopin's Waltz number 9 among other works. Later, at 7:30 p.m. on June 17, 1957, she played a half hour program of works by Beethoven and Chopin on radio station WGMS.

Recently, while moving parts of my collection, I found this record. Given its location, I have probably had it over forty years. I can only guess where I got it: Either a thrift store or a used book and record sale. To the best of her son's knowledge, these are the only recordings of her playing the piano.

Writing on the jacket lists the composers and works. The disc itself has the composers' names (Bach and Chopin) written in the center, label area of the disc in what looks like yellow grease pencil. (Up close and personal the composers' names do not appear as clearly as in the pictures.)

Note that these are all 16 bit, 44.1 KHz (i.e., CD quality) WAV files. They will take several minutes to download and start playing even with a fast Internet connection.


Ann Schein

A concert with the Manhattan String Quartet at Music Mountain, Falls Village, Conn., 7 Aug 1983. Eric Lewis, Roy Lewis, violins; John Dexter, viola; Judith Glyde, cello; Ann Schein, piano (Steinway).

The program was the Mozart String Quartet in B-flat, K. 589, the Debussy Quartet in G minor, Op. 10, and the Dohnányi Piano Quintet No. 1 in C minor, Op. 1.

I mostly avoid editorial remarks about the artists and recordings I put on my web site. However, in Schein's case I'm going to make an exception. I think she's the most under-rated pianist of the post-WWII era. It is a crime that she is not touring internationally and that no recording company has signed her to a long-term contract to record the many masterpieces of the piano literature.

Tracklists in Word format, in case you want to make CD's.

Note that these are all 16 bit, 44.1 KHz (i.e., CD quality) WAV files. They will take several minutes to download and start playing even with a fast Internet connection.


Alexander Sklarevski

Alexander Sklarevski, born in Romania ca. 1882, came to the U.S. after the October 1917 Revolution. He taught piano at the Peabody Conservatory from 1923 to 1953. He died in 1963. Most of what little I know about him comes from Russian Wikipedia and the 1940 U.S. Census.

I recently acquired a twelve-inch, 33 1/3 rpm (though it actually plays at closer to 35.3 rpm) acetate transcription disc, one side of which contains "Portion of HAlf HOUR/ProGRAM RECORDED BY:/ALEXANDER SKLAREVSKI/concert PiANist." (The slashes indicate line breaks in the text on the label. I have preserved the idiosyncratic capitalization on the label, which is handwritten in blue or blue-black fountain pen ink.) The date on the label is "April 16, 1954." Printed on the label is "Collection of Dean Lloyd Garrison," who probably cut the acetate and who probably wrote the information quoted above.

The disc was lot 2869 on Lawrence F. (Larry) Holdridge's auction that closed January 3, 2018. The other side of the disc is an interview with Fraser Gange (google him).

There are no announcements or applause to help determine the circumstances of the recording. April 16, 1954, was Good Friday. An examination of the Baltimore Sun for the week before Good Friday and a few days after reveals neither an advertisement for a recital by Sklarevski nor a review of one. Similarly, the radio listings for April 16 contain no mention of Sklarevski. The Peabody Conservatory has complete records for all performances in Friedheim Hall. Sklarevski did not perform there on April 16, 1954. Larry Holdridge does not have any other part of this recital. So this one remains a puzzler.

My thanks to Donald Manilidi, curator, International Piano Archives at Maryland (IPAM), for identifying the first piece on the program. My thanks to Matthew Testa, archivist at the Peabody Conservatory, for providing the dates Sklarevski taught at Peabody and for checking the performances in Friedheim Hall in April 1954.

Note that these are all 16 bit, 44.1 KHz (i.e., CD quality) WAV files. They will take several minutes to download and start playing even with a fast Internet connection.


Created: 2 Mar 2018
Changed: 5 Nov 2018